Get checked

You may feel
fine, but medical professionals advise that regular check-ups are necessary
even for the healthiest among us.

“Prevention’s
better than cure,” says general practitioner Dr. Marli Ellis, and check-ups can
give you a heads up that something is wrong and could potentially nip some
problems in the bud.

Ellis
says it’s a good idea to get initial check-ups to establish a baseline and
depending on the findings, determine how frequently you need to go back for the
next examination or screening.

“A
lot depends on family history,” she says, adding that if there is a strong
family tendency towards diabetes, heart disease or certain kinds of cancers,
then an individual should ensure they get checked more regularly than people
without that family history.

Recent
debates over at what age women should begin getting mammograms to screen for
breast cancer may have led to some confusion in the United States, but
recommendations in Cayman are that women should have mammograms every two years
from the age of 40.

“With
all regular medical check-ups, it is a good idea to get a baseline check done.
For example, checking cholesterol, if there is a history of high cholesterol in
your family, it’s a good idea to get that check done much earlier than for
someone with no significant family history of it. Then, depending on your
results, your doctor would determine if you need to get checked on a yearly
basis,” Ellis says.

While
doctors, medical agencies and organisations can give general guidelines as to
how often one should get checked for a variety of illnesses and conditions,
it’s basically down to the individual and his and her health and fitness level.

But
getting screened for a plethora of diseases on a regular basis can be
expensive. Not all screenings and check-ups are covered by insurance – it
varies from one insurance company to the next and from one policy to the next.

CINICO’s
public relations manager and senior insurance administrator Mark Frye says the
insurance company, which covers Cayman’s civil servants, indigents and
seafarers, will pay for any check-up a doctor recommends. “If you go to a
primary care physician and say ‘I have a feeling about my health’ and the
primary care physician says ‘Let me do some tests’, you’ll be covered. If it’s
recommended by a doctor, we will pay for it,” Frye says.

Before
undergoing a battery of checks, check with your insurance provider beforehand
to make sure that these examinations and screening are covered by your premium.

0
0

NO COMMENTS