Interactive map: How the port will impact life in the harbour

Much of the debate around the cruise berthing facility has centered on the potential impact on the wrecks and reefs in the harbour.

Amid conflicting reports about the health of the marine life in the impacted area, we enlisted the help of underwater photographer Courtney Platt and produced an interactive graphic to demonstrate exactly what lies beneath the glassy surface.

Each of the flashing dots on the aerial image above, correlates to a specific dive site. Click on the dots to see images taken at those locations and a short description of the sites and what the available reports say about how they could be impacted.

Campaigners celebrate court decision

Campaigners were celebrating Tuesday following a court decision to delay the port referendum to allow a legal challenge to take place. Shirley Roulstone, a leading...

Government cancels public meetings amid referendum delay

Premier Alden McLaughlin said Tuesday that his concern that the referendum on the cruise and cargo project would be delayed had been realised. In a...
Nadia Hardie, executive director, National Trust

National Trust heads to court over cruise referendum

The National Trust will be in court Tuesday morning for the first phase of its legal challenge to the referendum on the port project, according to the organisation’s executive director, Nadia Hardie.

How a small campaign snowballed to force a referendum

The movement started in Katrina Jurn’s living room: six people gathered together after work because they didn’t like what they were hearing about a proposed cruise ship berth being built in George Town Harbour.

PR firm paid $70k for pro-port campaign

Public relations firm Kelly Holding won a $70,000 contract to support government’s marketing push in support of the cruise port development, according to documents released under the Freedom of Information Law.

Under the weed, life abounds

The large floating mats of algae provide shelter for juvenile fish, eels and sea turtles. Flying fish lay their eggs amid this tangled mass. A vast cast of eclectic critters, like the thumbnail-sized sargassum frog fish, live their entire lives within the weed.

For sea turtles and sargassum, the relationship is complicated

At sea, sargassum provides vital shelter for a variety of species. Young turtle hatchlings even hitch rides on these floating mats, as they venture into the open ocean. But when the algae comes ashore in significant quantities, this beneficial relationship is betrayed.

Sargassum fertiliser offers alternative for organic agriculture

When Johanan Dujon began harvesting sargassum in Saint Lucia in 2014, he collected 1,500 pounds of the seaweed. This year, with his company Algas Organics, he is on track to harvest 1 million pounds.

Sargassum houses turn seaweed invasion into economic opportunity

Inspired by memories of his grandparents’ adobe house, a periodic place of refuge, Omar Vazquez developed a low-cost alternative to cement, using a substance that has invaded Caribbean shores in recent years – sargassum seaweed.

To protect tourist economy, resorts invest in seaweed-control business

To protect the paradisiac image of Caribbean beaches, sargassum control has risen as another pillar of the region’s tourist industry – and in Mexico, securing sargassum-control contracts has become competitive.

Friday Freatures