Issues

Issues is a new section in the Cayman Compass, where we examine significant topics impacting both the Cayman Islands and the region over several weeks. If you have ideas, or concerns you believe we should be delving into, please contact us.

All passenger flights in and out of Cayman will be suspended for 3 weeks.

Hurricane evacuations unlikely

As the country prepares for what is expected to be an active hurricane season at a time when borders remain closed both locally and internationally, there are concerns that evacuation flights will not be an option if a large storm heads Cayman’s way.

Indian community survives COVID-19 by leaning on each other

Members of Cayman’s Indian community head back to their home country Friday with their heads held high after helping each other through an “unimaginable experience” during the COVID-19 pandemic.

1 new COVID-19 case; DoT to contact stipend registrants

201 people have now tested positive for COVID-19 out of 24,069 individuals tested.
Commuters were stuck in jams for more than three hours between West Bay and George Town

Traffic gridlock as historic blaze closes highway

Traffic ground to a standstill Monday morning as the landfill fire caused the closure of a large section of the Esterley Tibbetts Highway.

The Great Rush Hour Race

Four commuters, four different modes of transport, two routes, one race. Car vs. bike, kayak vs. bus. To conclude our month-long series investigating causes of, and potential solutions to, the island’s traffic troubles, we wanted to challenge the assumption that the car is still the best way to travel in Cayman. So we put it to the test in a rush-hour race.

Electric rides help commuters dodge traffic

From electric scooters to one-wheel e-skateboards, new types of battery powered vehicles are helping a growing number of commuters dodge the traffic.

Charting a course: Women in modern maritime industries

Times are changing Not satisfied with a background role, women in today’s maritime industry are stepping forward and upward. Their impact - in shore-based and seagoing roles including female seafarers, captains of mega-ships, CEOs of shipping companies, and maritime lawyers, to name but a few - is thankfully becoming increasingly hard to ignore.

How Cayman developed a seafaring identity

To those Caymanians who are dismayed by the possibility of a dying heritage, recognise, without apology, that you are already emotionally attached to your ancestors, and so you do not need to live as they did to safeguard your past – your past has already been lived and thus felt on your behalf.

Cayman maintains shipbuilding tradition with a twist

Off island, Cayman maintains a strong reputation in the shipbuilding business. In particular, Cayman has risen as a recognised and reliable jurisdiction for managing yacht construction, overseeing 43% of new builds in the superyacht business

Year in Review: The summer of sargassum

An occasional menace in summers past, sargassum swamped Cayman’s beaches in such volumes this year, the problem became impossible to ignore.

Under the weed, life abounds

The large floating mats of algae provide shelter for juvenile fish, eels and sea turtles. Flying fish lay their eggs amid this tangled mass. A vast cast of eclectic critters, like the thumbnail-sized sargassum frog fish, live their entire lives within the weed.

For sea turtles and sargassum, the relationship is complicated

At sea, sargassum provides vital shelter for a variety of species. Young turtle hatchlings even hitch rides on these floating mats, as they venture into the open ocean. But when the algae comes ashore in significant quantities, this beneficial relationship is betrayed.
Climate analyst Rueanna Haynes says small islands are fighting for their survival in climate change negotiations.

Small islands can ‘lead by example’ in climate fight

Low-lying islands like Grand Cayman could become uninhabitable within the next century without “transformative change” in the global approach to climate change. That’s the verdict of Rueanna Haynes, a climate analyst and guest speaker at the RF Cayman Economic Outlook conference.
Cayman has built back stronger after Hurricane Ivan but climate change could make us more vulnerable to severe storms.

Hurricanes and climate change: What the science says

One of the primary concerns for Cayman Islands residents when it comes to climate change, is what impact the phenomenon will have on hurricanes.
Tourism planners in Antigua are exploring more eco-friendly, low impact options for visitors.

Caribbean tourism industry contends with climate change

Across the Caribbean region, tourism stakeholders are grappling with the reality of climate change and the threat it poses to the region’s hospitality sector. From Antigua to Dominica, officials are working on plans to protect their islands and their economies.

Calico’s owner: ‘We should have built piers years ago’

Handel Whittaker is one of the most recognisable faces on Seven Mile Beach. After nearly two decades as the proprietor of Calico Jack’s and...

Langevin: ‘Do we want quality or quantity?’

As the manager of the Cayman Islands’ most luxurious resort, Marc Langevin has a vested interest in the future of the island’s tourism product. Amid an ongoing debate about tourism growth, the general manager of The Ritz-Carlton, Grand Cayman is keen to see the island retain its reputation as a safe, high-quality destination.
Tourists on Seven Mile Beach

How much tourism is too much for a small island?

Cayman's tourism industry is thriving. But amid the debate over if and how to develop the island's port facilities, some are wondering, if the growth in visitors is sustainable and what the impact of rising visitation might mean for the island over the coming decades.
The George Town landfill, also known as Mount Trashmore

Half a century of Mount Trashmore

What started as an informal dump site in the 1960s has now become a protagonist in day-to-day life in Cayman. The Compass compiled a short history of waste management in Grand Cayman to explain how the island got to this point.

Post-Dorian Bahamas reexamines climate-resilient tourism

Bahamas Prime Minister Hubert Minnis describes Hurricane Dorian as a watershed moment for the Commonwealth nation. There is The Bahamas that existed before September 2019, and the nation now, fully aware of its vulnerability to climate change as a developing island state.

Kirkconnell: Caribbean tourism ‘stronger together’

During the Caribbean Travel Marketplace in Nassau, Bahamas, the Cayman Compass caught up with Minister of Tourism Moses Kirkconnell to discuss climate-resilient tourism in the Caribbean region, cruise tourism and the benefits of regional collaboration.

This week