Mask making for children

Children will have the opportunity make their own traditional carnival masks as well as learn a little about the history of Caribbean carnivals and Batabano in particular, during a special Carnival Mask Design workshop at Camana Bay on Saturday, 21 April.

The workshop will be led by Nasaria Suckoo Chollette who, in addition to being a prolific artist, writer and poet, trained as a theatre teacher. She therefore has a solid grounding in the use of masks in theatre in addition to having researched Jonkanoo and the carnival tradition in the Caribbean in her role at the National Museum, where she has created the Children’s Gallery exhibition.

Youngsters will therefore receive a little background on the use of masks in African culture and how these traditions were brought over with slavery. “At Christmas time, the slave masters would give their slaves three days off,” she says. “The slaves would pull together whatever they could find to make masks and costumes and then they would go from house to house singing and dancing.”

Children will have the opportunity to create masks in a similar way. “As much as possible we will use materials that we can find – tree bark, seeds, leaves, beans and so on,” Nasaria says.

Once completed, youngsters will have a traditional carnival mask ready in time for the Junior Batabano parade the following weekend.

The workshops takes place from 2.30pm to 3.30pm, at Heliconia, across from Frosted Robin. This is a free event and spaces are limited. To register contact k[email protected]

Youngsters will receive a little background on the use of masks in African culture and how these traditions were brought over with slavery.

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