50 years ago: District kids excel at sports day

NEW Bodden-50-years-logo-final-595x420In the April 6, 1966 edition of the Caymanian Weekly, a precursor of the Cayman Compass, Bodden Town correspondent Haig Bodden wrote:

“Although the Inter-Scholastic Sports held in West Bay last week have been covered by another reporter I still feel constrained to write about the excellent performances of the Bodden Town children.

“The Bodden Town school under the able leadership of its Head Mistress, Mrs. Hildred Ebanks, won, with great distinction the ‘United Insurance Cup’ for the Junior events.

“Their score of 34 points was more than 70% above that of the runner-up. It was also about 50% of the total score.

“Small, but fleet-footed and energetic Raymond Terry was the Champion Boy, taking a total of 9 prizes. Raymond had also been the Champion Boy last year. Dalphene Moore, from the same school was the Champion Girl. Each of these children received a special prize.

“In the Senior events, Rita Hayworth Levy, also of this district tied with another competitor for the title of Champion Girl. It was also noted that many of the prizes for Senior events were won by children from this district.

“High credit must go to the Education Officer and his band of hard working teachers for their strenuous efforts in making the sports day the success that it was.

“I cannot close without paying special tribute to Ernie Bodden of George Town who won the much coveted ‘Hunter Cup’ for the high jump. Ernie is an outstanding athlete and undoubtedly the idol of all sports fans.”

Public meeting

“On Tuesday night, March 29, Dr. Hague, an expert from the F.A.O. (Food and Agriculture Organization) of the United Nations spoke at a public meeting in the Town Hall in Bodden Town.

“Only 12 persons, including the speaker and 2 ladies, were present. Three farmers were in attendance. However, the small attendance was the one belittling factor. The speaker proved to be an able orator, and those present took an active part in the questions and discussions at the end of his talk.

“Dr. Hague spoke quite frankly as he had been inadvertently informed that no member of the press was present.”