Seafarers once relied on beacons like these to navigate.
Seafarers once relied on beacons like these to navigate.

Made up of 36 archaeological maritime sites across Grand Cayman, Cayman Brac and Little Cayman, the Maritime Heritage Trail is a driving route through some of Cayman’s most scenic areas.

Stops are marked by roadside signs at important maritime sites that include lighthouses, shipwrecks and historic anchorages.

The eastern districts feature a number of the 19 Grand Cayman stops, including Duck Pond careenage, the Iphigenia and Juga wrecks, the East End Lighthouse, the Wreck of the Ten Sail and Rum Point.

With all points on the trail marked by distinctive blue and white signs, the Wreck of the Ten Sail stop is easy to find, thanks to the giant anchor propped up next to the side of the road. Rum Point offers up a family friendly destination.

The National Museum teamed up with the Department of Environment, the National Archive and the National Trust to develop and launch the Maritime Heritage Trail in 2003.

“Spanning all three Caymanian islands, the trail is the first maritime trail of its kind in the Caribbean and combines education, heritage and recreational tourism,” the museum’s website notes.

A huge anchor signals one of the trail stops. - Photo: Jewel Levy
A huge anchor signals one of the trail stops. – Photo: Jewel Levy

“A three-part approach aims to protect, manage, and interpret the Cayman Islands’ national heritage.”

The Cayman Compass previously reported that based on Florida’s maritime Heritage Trail, the trail aims to provide awareness, enjoyment and education of Cayman’s maritime heritage to the public.

1
0

NO COMMENTS