Icon delivers stellar show in landmark theatre

A catapult for the imagination since 1926, the Tampa Theatre is a symbol of the city’s glorious past and bright future. Tampa Theatre is a fiercely protected landmark and one of America’s best-preserved examples of grand movie palace architecture.

David Byrne

Byrne wowed the crowd at his sold-out show at the Tampa Theatre on 12 December. Photo: Don Martin

Tampa Theatre provided an intimate setting for a ‘concert for the ages’ to the more than 1,300 fortunate and passionate patrons who experienced the David Byrne concert on a full moon over Tampa Bay on a chilly yet beautiful evening last Friday.

The event featured two incredible icons. The first being Tampa Theatre, which offers a warm, intimate setting.

Place David Byrne on stage – one of rock’s most influential and charismatic frontmen – and you had one riveting night.

Talking Heads equals David Byrne. Byrne was the lead singer and songwriter for this infamous 1970’s and early 1980’s rock band.

Talking Heads toured Europe with the Ramones before recording their first album in 1977, and then went on to US Top 40 success over the next several years. T

Talking Heads was a band of smart, self-conscious white musicians intrigued by rhythms and the sprit of black music. Their energy was drawn from funk and African rock to create some of the most adventurous, original and danceable music to emerge from the new wave and punk era.

‘Everything That Happens Will Happen Today’ is Byrne’s new album and the basis for this new tour. He teams with long-time producer Brian Eno to deliver a critically-acclaimed new composition, which blends incredibly well with the classic Talking Heads work.

Clad in all white, Byrne kicked off the show with a simple expectation: ‘It’s a set menu. No substitutions. I’ll be your waiter. My name’s Dave.’

The four-piece band, three acoustic vocalists and three choreographic dancers blended art, music and entertainment that was stand up, gawk, put-your-brain-in-motion to reconfirm exactly where you are.

‘I Zimbra’ from the 1980 ‘Remain In Light’ album kicked off the show with a rock and dance expo showcasing Byrne’s quirky and sometimes nervous persona with a beat that makes this music iPod intravenous.

Byrne was masterful, blending his solo hits with those from the magical days with Talking Heads. Deliver he did. This audience came to see and hear Talking Heads hits and David Byrne did not disappoint.

He soon followed with one of my favourite tunes ‘Crosseyed and Painless,’ also from the ‘Remain In Light’ album. The hits continued with an excellent rendition of ‘Take Me to the River,’ from the 1978 debut album ‘More Songs About Buildings and Food.’ Tampa Theatre isn’t used to crowds quite so enthusiastic about the performers, as the ushers quickly gave up on attempting to ask the patrons to be seated.

Pulling more classics from ‘Remain In Light,’ Byrne cranked out ‘Once In A Lifetime’ to an over- the-top, frenzied crowd. Encore performances followed with ‘Burning Down The House’ from the 1983 album ‘Speaking in Tongues,’ and a brilliant all-out performance of ‘Life During Wartime’ from the 1979 ‘Fear of Music’ masterpiece.

Byrne capped off the night with the new hit single and album ‘Everything That Happens Will Happen Today.’

FYI

For details and future events at Tampa Theatre, see www.tampatheatre.org. For info and concert dates for David Byrne see www.davidbyrne.com.

Byrne was masterful, blending his solo hits with those from the magical days with Talking Heads. Deliver he did. This audience came to see and hear Talking Heads hits and David Byrne did not disappoint.

0
0

NO COMMENTS