Women freeze eggs to look for ‘Mr Right’

Women
in their late 30s are freezing eggs because they are still hunting for “Mr
Right”, research suggests.

A
study of women at a Belgian clinic found half wanted to freeze their eggs to
take the pressure off finding a partner, a fertility conference heard.

A
third were also having eggs frozen as an “insurance policy” against
infertility.

Many
students would also consider the procedure to focus on a career before
motherhood, a separate UK survey found.

The
study of nearly 200 students showed eight in 10 doing a medical degree would
freeze their eggs to delay starting a family.

Among
sports and education students half said they would consider it.

Egg
freezing is still a relatively new technology, which enables a woman to save
eggs for future IVF treatment if needed.

The
chance of success is better with younger, healthier eggs, yet most women
currently choosing the procedure are in their late 30s and opting for egg
freezing as a “last resort”.

The
average cost of egg freezing is around $4,500 per attempt and some women may
have to undergo up to three cycles in order to preserve a good number of eggs.

Speaking
at the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology conference, Dr
Julie Nekkebroeck, who carried out the small Belgian study of 15 women, said
they also found that 27 per cent wanted to give their relationship a chance to
blossom before bringing up the subject of having a baby.

The
women who had an average age of 38 did not expect to use their frozen eggs
until they were around 43 and they realised they needed to undergo the
procedure while they were still healthy and fertile.

“We
found that they had all had partners in the past, and one was currently in a
relationship, but they had not fulfilled their desire to have a child because
they thought that they had not found the right man.”

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Failure to find ‘Mr Right’ is driving a growing number of older women to put motherhood on ice.
Photo: Dailymail.co.uk

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