Gawker's Cayman connection may halt Tanantino lawsuit

Movie director Quentin Tarantino is suing the Gawker website for leaking the script of his latest movie, but the company claims that as it is a Cayman Islands corporation, the California court dealing with the suit has no jurisdiction. 

Hollywood Reporter reported that according to a motion filed Wednesday, “This court lacks personal jurisdiction over [Gawker Media Group, Inc.], a Cayman Islands corporation which is not subject to general jurisdiction because it does not have any continuous and systematic contacts with California and is not subject to specific jurisdiction because it does not publish the website at issue in plaintiff’s complaint and was not involved in any way with the researching, writing, editing, or publishing of the article that is the subject of plaintiff’s complaint.” 

Tarantino is suing Gawker for contributory copyright infringement in connection with Gawker’s Defamer blog publishing a link to the director’s 146-page script of his Western “Hateful Eight.” He has since said he does not plan to go ahead with making the movie. 

His lawsuit stated that Gawker “crossed the journalistic line by promoting itself to the public as the first source to read the entire screenplay illegally.” 

Gawker, in its motion, said that its company had no operations or employees in California or elsewhere, but is a “Cayman Islands holding company.” 

The website published the link to the script on Jan. 21, according to the motion. “On this date, plaintiff gave an interview, which was widely reported in the media, to the effect that he had given copies of the script to certain individuals and that the script was now circulating publicly,” the motion stated. 

According to Hollywood Reporter, in a Jan. 30 post, Gawker editor John Cook blamed Tarantino for “deliberately” turning the leak into news by revealing it to the press. 

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Tarantino is suing Gawker for contributory copyright infringement in connection with Gawker’s Defamer blog publishing a link to the director’s 146-page script of his Western “Hateful Eight.”