Final flight for BA jet

The last British Airways Boeing 767-300 flight out of Grand Cayman gets a water cannon salute on the runway of the Owen Roberts International Airport on Wednesday. – PHOTO: INGE POULUS

Airport staff bid farewell to an old friend Wednesday when the last British Airways Boeing 767-300 jet departed the Cayman Islands.

The airline is phasing the model out of its fleet and from Friday it will be replaced with the newer 777-200 aircraft on the Grand Cayman-to-London route.

The old aircraft got the traditional water cannon salute as it taxied down the runway at Owen Roberts International Airport for the last time Wednesday evening. A small crowd of plane spotters gathered to mark the occasion.

British Airways says the new aircraft will add a level of luxury for regular travelers and could mean a slight increase in airlift from the U.K., though flights will still be routed through the Bahamas.



  1. And not a minute too soon! These jets were scheduled for replacement last year but the timing of that move kept getting revised as BA used their newer fleet on what they perceived as more commercially important routes.

    The state of these elderly 767s was getting to be a disgrace. BA appeared to be leaving all non-essential repairs and literally running the aircraft into the ground. Broken seats and issues with the entertainment system or toilets seemed to be the norm on my recent flights. It was sadly reminiscent of the final days of the DC-10 service from Gatwick when just about flight I made on the route was a bit of an adventure.

    But I wouldn’t get too excited about the new equipment. Average fleet age for the 767 is 22 years, most of the 777-200 fleet was delivered between 1996 and 2001.

    This is in stark contrast to the lucky tourists who are flying on Thomson Airways to other destinations in the region like Cuba, the DR, Jamaica and Costa Rica – they’re enjoying all the comforts of brand new 787 Dreamliners.


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