Lindsay: Gay marriage debate – policy, or politics?

Alric Lindsay

We know that many groups have fought for civil rights and other liberties in the past. One example is the right to vote. Another is same-sex marriage, which will now be featured in the 2017 Cayman election campaigns as a key discussion topic.

In all likelihood, politicians will be egging on voters on both sides of the issue, while pastors will be coming out, armed with their usual quotes about sin and damnation. The saddest part about all of this, however, is that the same-sex probe may just be a political diversion.

Politicians count on voters and their partners to be emotional. A heated discussion on same-sex marriage is guaranteed to draw attention away from unemployment, failed government policies, the ever-increasing welfare state, rising crime, broken immigration legislation and the delicate state of healthcare. Voters are aware of this, but they will get heated and distracted anyway.

The fact is that the government recently acknowledged the right of a same-sex couple to have one spouse listed as a dependent in connection with matters related to the immigration law.

The government will now try to pretend that this did not occur and chronicle its attempt to take a hard stance on the issue. This is disingenuous and misleading.

If Caymanian voters are not careful, they will unknowingly commit the biggest sin – voting in a party dictatorship which has no goals but its own. Caymanians must remember their own goals – to get employed, to receive equal pay for equal work, increase awareness as to nature conservation, reducing the cost of living (and not being debt slaves) and eradicating crime.

Being embattled in a sex talk during elections will not take us closer to these goals.

It will just lead us into a room where we discover after the votes are cast that we have been hoodwinked, bamboozled, hornswoggled and duped.

Alric Lindsay is a local attorney.