First named storm, Arthur, forms over weekend

The expected path of Tropical Storm Arthur over the next three days. - Image: National Hurricane Center

Arthur, the first named storm of this year’s hurricane season, formed east of Florida over the weekend.

The tropical storm, which as of Monday morning had sustained winds of 45 miles per hour, is heading in a northeasterly direction, and is expected to start to dissipate by Tuesday night or early Wednesday, according to the US National Hurricane Center.

The storm poses no threat to the Cayman Islands.

As of Monday morning, it was located about 210 miles south-southwest of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, moving north-northeast at 14 miles per hour.

“Arthur is forecast to turn away from the east coast of the United States Monday night and Tuesday,” the National Hurricane Center added.

A tropical storm warning is in effect for a portion of the North Carolina coast, as strong winds and heavy rains are forecast for that area, according to the NHC.

Hurricane season typically begins on 1 June. This is the sixth consecutive year that the first storm of the season has formed before that date.

Early season forecasts predict an above-average year for storms in the Atlantic.

Colorado State University’s Tropical Meteorology Project, in its forecast report released last month, states that the region can expect 16 named storms, including eight hurricanes and four major hurricanes. The prediction would mean two fewer named storms than the 2019 season, but two more hurricanes and one additional major hurricane.

The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which runs the National Hurricane Center, is expected to release its official forecast on 21 May.

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