Poll: Still no confidence in HSA

Nearly two-thirds of the 492 respondents to the most recent caycompass.com online poll said they were not too confident or not confident at all in the quality of health care offered by Cayman’s Health Services Authority.

The results of the two-week poll were very close to the results of a similar poll question posed in October, 2007.

The largest segment people, 201 respondents (40.9 per cent) said they were not confident at all in HSA’s quality of health care. In 2007, 40.3 per cent of 466 respondents said they had no confidence in the HSA.

‘It seems that the level of health care has deteriorated since the formation of the Health Authority, with the constant changing of CEOs and the loss of competent doctors from the system,’ said one of the recent poll’s respondents. ‘One would have to be oblivious not to realise that there has been a political holocaust in the government hospital system over recent years, and this should not have happened.’

‘I have absolutely no confidence in the Health Services on these three islands,’ said another respondent. ‘This is based on past experience. What a waste of government money. It is nothing more than a glorified clinic at best.’

‘I certainly wouldn’t want to go there with any sort of major illness or injury,’ said someone else.

Another 120 people (24.4 per cent) said they were not too confident in the HSA’s health care. This corresponded to the 24.7 per cent of respondents in the October 2007 poll that said they had little confidence in the HSA.

Another 111 people (22.6 per cent) said they were somewhat confident in the services offered by the HSA. This compared to 24.5 per cent of the respondents to the 2007 poll who said they had a fair amount of confidence in the HSA.

‘Some departments are excellent, whilst others are well below what should be expected,’ said one person.

‘I personally never had any real issues, knock on wood,’ said another respondent. ‘But I have heard some horror stories.’

‘The only problem I have is with appointment times,’ said someone else. ‘Why give people an appointment time if they are going to make them wait four hours? If someone loses their job because they go back to work late, is the authority going to pay for their bills?’

‘I’m new to the island and went to them because they were cheaper than private doctors,’ said another person. ‘In my experience, you get what you pay for.’

Only 37 people (7.5 per cent) said they were very confident about the quality of health care offered by the HSA. This compares to 8.6 per cent of the respondents in the 2007 poll that said they had great confidence in the HSA.

‘I’m as confident as I would be with any other healthcare provider,’ said one respondent. ‘None are 100 per cent perfect. As an ex-pat, I think it’s better than the UK’s National Health Service.’

Twenty-three people (4.7 per cent) said they did not know the answer to the question.

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