You can’t stop time

You can’t stop time. You can, however, make better use of it.

I am referring to the fact that the Cayman Islands does not currently observe daylight savings time. I own two businesses in George Town and in these tough economic times it is a frustrating and helpless feeling to watch hundreds and on some days thousands of potential customers leaving by early to mid afternoon before seeing the majority of George Town.

We could easily give them an extra hour to shop, tour, eat lunch, etc. by simply switching to daylight savings time.

This change would also alleviate the pedestrian congestion verses the local vehicular traffic issue. The majority of the ‘rush hour’ vehicles would have an extra hour in the morning to get into town, thus significantly reducing the overlap between the two events.

Since finance and tourism are the two pillars of our economy, I discussed the issue with individuals from both areas and they have all expressed positive interest in the idea.

The financial industry would gain an hour of business with New York and London and our Island’s stayover visitors would have an extra hour of sunlight to enjoy what our island has to offer. This would also make flight scheduling easier for the airline industry and an hour would not be lost by locals when flying to popular destinations such as Miami, New York, Atlanta, and Charlotte.

In addition, I am sure that many of our Island’s residents would find an extra hour of sunlight useful as it encourages outdoor activities that promote fitness and health instead of lethargic couch potatoes and Internet addicts.

Lastly, but probably the most important benefit is the increase in business would mean an increase in demand for employees, which equates to less unemployment and a decrease in crime.

Coincidentally, two years ago, when we began to notice a decline in cruise arrivals, the United States increased daylight savings time by four weeks. In hindsight we should have made the change to daylight savings time as well, in order to counteract the effect of decreasing cruise ship arrivals.

As Caymanians we need to follow in the footsteps of our wise forefathers e.g. Jim Bodden and Sir Vassel Johnson and continue to make smart proactive decisions that allow us to maintain our good standard of living and the admiration and respect of all who visit our islands.

Noel March

Since finance and tourism are the two pillars of our economy, I discussed the issue with individuals from both areas and they have all expressed positive interest in the idea.

0
0

NO COMMENTS