Defendants face range of charges

The indictments made public Wednesday were against three distinct categories of defendants: FIFA officials, sports media and marketing executives, and businessmen and bankers who are alleged to have laundered money from the bribes.

Here’s who they are and what they have been charged with:

Jeffrey Webb: Current FIFA vice president, CONCACAF (North and Central American and Caribbean region for FIFA) president, and Cayman Islands Football Association president. He is charged with 15 counts in the U.S. District Court indictment, including racketeering conspiracy, wire fraud conspiracy, money laundering and money laundering conspiracy.

Costas Takkas: Webb’s attaché and former Cayman Islands Football Association general secretary. He is charged with seven counts including racketeering conspiracy, wire fraud and money laundering conspiracy.

Eduardo Li: Costa Rican football federation president and FIFA executive committee member-elect. He is charged with five counts including racketeering conspiracy, wire fraud conspiracy and money laundering.

Julio Rocha: FIFA development officer and Nicaraguan football federation president. He faces five charges including racketeering conspiracy, wire fraud conspiracy and money laundering conspiracy.

Jack Warner: Former FIFA vice president and ex-CONCACAF president. He is charged with seven counts including racketeering conspiracy, wire fraud, wire fraud conspiracy and money laundering conspiracy.

Eugenio Figueredo: Current FIFA vice president and executive committee member; Uruguayan football federation president. He charged with five counts including racketeering conspiracy, wire fraud conspiracy, money laundering conspiracy, unlawful procurement of naturalization and aiding in the preparation of fraudulent tax returns.

Rafael Esquivel: Venezuelan football federal president. He faces three charges of racketeering conspiracy, wire fraud conspiracy and money laundering conspiracy.

Jose Maria Marin: Current member of FIFA’s Olympic football tournament organizing committee. He was charged with five counts including racketeering conspiracy, wire fraud conspiracy and money laundering conspiracy.

Nicolas Leoz: Former FIFA executive committee member and CONMEBOL (FIFA’s South American region) president. He’s charged with seven counts in the indictment including racketeering conspiracy, wire fraud conspiracy and money laundering conspiracy.

Alejandro Burzaco: Controlling principal of Argentina-based Torneos y Competencias, a sports marketing business. He’s charged with three counts including racketeering conspiracy, wire fraud conspiracy and money laundering conspiracy.

Aaron Davidson: President of Traffic Sports USA Inc. He faces a nine-count indictment that includes allegations of racketeering conspiracy, wire fraud conspiracy, money laundering and money laundering conspiracy.

Hugo and Mariano Jinkis: Controlling principals of Argentina-based Full Play Group S.A., a sports marketing business. They are charged with three counts apiece of racketeering conspiracy, money laundering conspiracy and wire fraud conspiracy.

Jose Margulies: Controlling principal of Valente Corp. and Somerton Ltd. This defendant is alleged to have served as an intermediary in facilitating payments between FIFA officials and marketing executives. He’s charged with four counts including racketeering conspiracy, money laundering conspiracy and wire fraud conspiracy.

Earlier pleas

Four other individuals, unbeknown to the general public, had already pleaded guilty in connection with the ongoing investigation, federal prosecutors said Wednesday.

Their cases were kept under seal until the arrests in Zurich and subsequent indictments. Those individuals include:

Daryll Warner: The son of defendant Jack Warner, a former FIFA development officer who pleaded guilty in July 2013 to wire fraud.

Daryan Warner: Pleaded guilty in October 2013 to three criminal counts including wire fraud and money laundering. Charles Blazer: The former CONCACAF general secretary pleaded guilty in November 2013 to a 10-count indictment alleging racketeering conspiracy, wire fraud, money laundering and income tax evasion

Charles Blazer: The former CONCACAF general secretary pleaded guilty in November 2013 to a 10-count indictment alleging racketeering conspiracy, wire fraud, money laundering and income tax evasion

Jose Hawilla: Owner and founder of Traffic Group, a Brazilian sports marketing multinational, pleaded guilty in December 2014 to a four-count indictment alleging racketeering conspiracy, wire fraud, money laundering and obstruction of justice. The company Traffic Sports USA and Traffic Sports International also pleaded to wire fraud conspiracy earlier this month.

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