Tracy Rankine led activities during the East End tea party. Photo: Alvaro Serey

The Cayman Islands Girls’ Brigade continued its 70th anniversary celebrations with a Feb. 25 tea party at East End.

The afternoon ceremony honored the history of the organization with a fashion show demonstrating historic brigade outfits and a slide show documenting seven decades of work.

Founder Olive Miller, 95, attended the party hosted at Audrey Whittaker’s residence.

“It’s the church’s mission to the girls. We’ve trained lots of leaders and taken girls all over the world,” Ms. Miller said, looking back on decades of friendship and charity work.

“I never expected to see [the 70th anniversary]. I think the organization is very lively and alive today, and fulfilling the aim of bringing girls into the church and the Christian faith.”

Deborah McLaughlin explained that the brigade focuses on four major development areas for members, including physical health, education, service work and spiritual life.

Throughout the year, groups across the island learn through exercises such as Zumba and swimming, classes on national history and life skills, and charity work like community clean up efforts.

Iva Good said Girls’ Brigade contributes to lifelong leadership skills.

from Bodden Town, Savannah, East End and George Town were represented at the tea party, where they participated in old-time games like the hokey pokey and enjoyed music from the Edna M. Moyle Primary School orchestra.

Past international president Iva Good reflected on the leadership skills that the organization teaches girls and young women.

“I go around to supermarkets and offices and people say, ‘thank you because if it weren’t for the Girls’ Brigade I wouldn’t be where I am today,’” she said.

The Girls’ Brigade has several international opportunities approaching. In August, five older members will travel to a camp in Ghana. Next year, five young leaders and five older leaders will travel to the international conference in Zambia.

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