Police: 24-hour curfew met with ‘almost complete compliance’

Police Commissioner Derek Byrne
Police Commissioner Derek Byrne

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Cayman’s 24-hour curfew, implemented on Wednesday, had met with “almost complete compliance” by the time it ended Saturday morning, according to Commissioner of Police Derek Byrne.

The curfew expired at 5am, when residents of the Cayman Islands were once again permitted to venture out of their homes to make trips to gather essential supplies.

The curfew had been in place since 7pm Wednesday night, and during the ensuing two-and-a-half-day period, Commissioner of Police Derek Byrne said he was pleased to see almost complete compliance.

On the final night of the curfew, Byrne said, there had been no breaches on Little Cayman, and of the 71 vehicles stopped on Cayman Brac overnight, two people while found to be in breach of the curfew and warned for intended prosecution.

On Grand Cayman, overnight Friday, where police made 66 interceptions, five people were found to be in breach of the curfew and warned for prosecution.

There were no arrests overnight Friday.

Since Wednesday night when the 24-hour curfew was put in place, a total of 1,411 interceptions were made by police officers, six people were arrested for committing offences and for breaking curfew, and 27 people were warned for intended prosecution, Byrne said.

Those found guilty of breaking the COVID-19 curfew could face a fine of up to $3,000 and or be imprisoned for up to one year.

Although the 24-hour ‘hard’ curfew has expired, a ‘soft’ curfew, which runs from 7pm to 5am each night until Friday, 3 April, remains in effect. On that date, the curfew arrangements will be reviewed.

Full coverage: Coronavirus

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