NRA marks shared bike/car lanes

A cyclist passes one of the new road markings in downtown George Town on Wednesday. - Photo: Taneos Ramsay

New ‘sharrows’ or markings that indicate lanes that are shared between bicycles and motor vehicles are being added to local roads.

According to a statement, the National Roads Authority began rolling out the sharrows on roadways on Monday, 7 Sept.

The markings are either white or green symbols showing two chevrons and a bicycle, and are used to indicate a “shared lane environment” for cyclists and motor vehicles.

The first sharrows are located along South Church Street by Paradise Restaurant, Harbour Drive, and on North Church Street by Delworth’s Esso.

According to the NRA, the cost of the sharrows is $200 each, and they are expected to appear at 15 locations.

In a press release, Infrastructure Minister Joey Hew commended the NRA for utilising various measures in support of road safety while highlighting that it is important that the community works together to ensure that everyone stays safe.

“For motorists, sharing the road begins with the understanding that cyclists and motorcyclists have the same rights as you. They face unique safety challenges, such as being smaller and less visible. We all have a duty as motorists, pedestrians and cyclists to look out for each other to prevent road offences and injuries,” Hew said.

The new markings will be put in place at 15 locations on Grand Cayman. – Photo: Taneos Ramsay

Transportation planner at the NRA, Marion Pandohie, in the statement, noted that studies have found that shared lane markings provide a significant benefit to cyclists by encouraging them to move out of danger.

“They also reinforce the legitimacy of bicycle traffic on the street, recommend proper bicyclist positioning, and may be configured to offer directional and wayfinding guidance,” she said.

The NRA stated that additional sharrows will be added to other roads in the coming weeks, including at Fort Street, Mary Street, Bodden Road and Shedden Road.

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