Three fined over waitress job

Three people were fined in Summary Court last week after pleading guilty to offences under the Immigration Law.

Noemi Alonzo Solis admitted working as a waitress at the Blue Lagoon while her work permit was only to be a domestic helper.

Sherly Ann Arthurs admitted employing Solis at the George Town establishment without a work permit.

Victor Austin Seymour was charged with aiding and abetting Solis by dropping her off at her work place.

Seymour and Solis also pleaded guilty to making false representations on work permit application forms – that Solis would be employed as a domestic helper.

Caymanians fear they are being overrun by foreign labour, Magistrate Margaret Ramsay-Hale said after hearing the facts and mitigation. Waitress work cannot be such a rarefied skill that Caymanians cannot do it.

The period of illegal work was 17 January until 26 July 2006.

Defence Attorney Lloyd Samson told the court that Seymour, 51, was employed in a managerial position with a local heavy equipment company. He has an elderly mother whom Solis assisted.

But there were times when she was not needed, so she took up extra employment for extra income.

Solis, 32, was attempting to provide for her family in Honduras, which includes four children and an elderly mother, Mr. Samson said.

Now, not being able to provide for them at all would be a considerable punishment for her.

The magistrate said all three defendants knew what they were doing when they offended against the Immigration Law, whether out of affection or business needs or personal needs. Each for his or her own reason sacrificed the law.

Solis had now lost forever the right to live and work here, the magistrate said. In doing so she had robbed her children of the income she would have earned if she had taken the time to do so legally.

The magistrate fined her $400 for working outside the conditions of her permit and $200 for each false representation, a total of $800.

Arthurs was fined $1,200 and told she must run her business within the confines of the law.

Seymour as a manager knew about work permits, the magistrate continued. In her view, there was a greater burden on him to ensure that the law was complied with – it was there for his protection and the protection of his fellow Caymanians. He had subverted the law to the detriment of the community.

She fined him $300 for aiding and abetting and $400 for each false representation, for a total of $1,300.

Mr. Samson told the court that Seymour would assist Solis with her fines.

Pullout:

Caymanians fear they are being overrun by foreign labour, Magistrate Margaret Ramsay-Hale said after hearing the facts and mitigation. Waitress work cannot be such a rarefied skill that Caymanians cannot do it.

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