Editorial for September 28: Hurricane hits still possible

It appears we’re in for a long wet
week.

And while (as of this writing) we
are in no danger of a hurricane, it is time to take stock in the weather and
where exactly we are on the seasonal calendar.

The most active week for hurricanes
– mid September – has passed. But this is not time to put our guard down.

As the Cape Verde season winds down
in late September and early October, the raging La Nina in the Pacific opens
the door for warm waters in the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico to take centre
stage.

We watched as Tropical Storm
Matthew danced through the Caribbean to the south of us last week leaving in
its wake the storm clouds that are delivering us a wet week.

Let this week’s blustery and wet
weather be a reminder to those who have not stocked up on hurricane supplies
(and shame on you for waiting so long).

Hurricane season is far from over.

Just because this is the first week
in a long while that the US National Hurricane Center hasn’t issued any
advisories on a named storm in the Atlantic doesn’t mean one can’t pop up.

If you haven’t done so, check your
hurricane supplies. Throw out anything – especially foodstuffs – that have
expired.

Know if you live in an area that is
prone to flood and make evacuation plans now.

And make sure that every member of
your family and those on your staff know what the hurricane plan of action will
be going forward.

While this week will be a wet
nuisance at its worst, we urge drivers to take their time to get to work,
school or while running errands. Many of our drivers forget that they should
slow down on wet streets. While we may be averting a weather disaster, we also
need to do all we can to ensure we don’t have roadway accidents that at the
least cause property and vehicle damage, but at worst, death.

Take a little extra time to get to
your destination if you’re driving and be extra cautious of the vehicles around
you. Stick your umbrella in your vehicle and enjoy the liquid sunshine.

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