Arteccentrix keeps moving

Independent gallery Arteccentrix has had a fruitful and varied 2011 and 2012 looks set to be similarly innovative. 

“We hosted a total of three fine art exhibitions,” said Nicklola McCoy-Snell, “introducing for the first time to the local art scene fine art photographer Amar Sheow whose works are even now creating an island-wide buzz through the many design houses. 

“Arteccentrix also presented the largest showing of works by sculptor Scott Swing, with some controversial and exotically charged works in last group exhibition which was held in November of this year. We also hosted the final and last collection of the works of now deceased artist Susan Widmer. The gallery has been selected by the family of the late Sue Widmer to be the only venue through which retailers and wholesalers can have access to fine art prints of Sue’s works.” 

 

Shifting operations 

The gallery shifted operations from Governor’s Square to Dorcy Drive in 2011, which in part was so Nickola could concentrate on her own work. 

“I was able to give clients a closer look at the art in progress. It afforded me the opportunity to do something I have never been able to do before in my career as an artist. 

“I was able to immerse completely into the world for which I live. The time spent in studio everyday will be sorely missed,” she tells us. 

And she tells us that because Arteccentrix is closing its gallery and exhibition area largely, she notes, because of the overhead costs inherent in doing business. 

“However, we will still operate the business as we did before opening the physical exhibition space. We will offer artwork for sale online the printing side of the business will continue to be operated by my husband Maurice. Therefore, we will be able to continue to create the very best in fine art Giclee on Island. We will maintain a limited stable of artists whose original and prints will be readily available for local and international purchase through our website. 

“For in person viewing we deliver for free locally as before so in that regard the clients will have receive more one on one consulting when purchasing a piece of work. We will however, host a number of group shows that will be coordinated with private sponsors in some exciting new spaces.” 

There’s also a Live With programme, which allows people to choose some work and live with it for three to five working days to decide if it fits – a unique scheme on island and rather a sensible one. 

 

Charity innovation 

One of her own projects was 100 paintings 100 days for $100, which was completed with a couple of days to spare earlier this year. 

“To date over $500 of art supplies have been donated to the Sunrise Adult Centre. The outpatient facility for the disabled has been extremely pleased with the donations. Former director Roberta Gordon has been a great supported of the effort and was happy to see the results prior to leaving her post in October of this year.  

“There are still a number of paintings still available from the series and monies from the effort will still be donated to the Sunrise Adult Centre,” Nickola tells us. 

 

Art scene 

The Cayman art scene of 2011, she adds, wasn’t as inspiring as it could have been. 

“The art scene in 2011 was a bit of a bore to be honest. With Arteccentrix not producing as many shows as it did in 2010 no one else stepped up to the board so all in all I would say it was a pretty boring year for art. The National Gallery did host an interesting show that featured newcomer Greg Lipton and works by their own Anne Goulden that I felt was a cut above the other stuff that was being touted. 

“I believe that with the opening of the new National Gallery building and all the they will be offering both in old and new programmes the landscape of fine art could be positively affected. We could see some great new developments. I also believe that the May Faire could be very instrumental in changing and enhancing what could potentially be on of Caymans most vital resources, it’s fine art culture.”
Outspoken, colourful and always ready with an idea – it’s the heart of art. But we expect nothing less from those Arteccentrix guys.