Gambling a hot issue locally

The issue of gambling in the Cayman Islands has been debated with fervour for many years but ultimately, the church-oriented stance has prevailed and gaming has never been formally accepted in the territory. 

With Christianity being the main religion in the society, it has been nearly a foregone conclusion that there would be no gambling in the Cayman Islands. 

Pastor Alson Ebanks of the Church of God on Walker’s Road explained why gambling is frowned upon by the church. 

“Our position is the general evangelical position and we do not support or encourage gambling in casinos or otherwise.” 

He added that, “The problem with gambling is that it promotes an approach to life that is less than healthy. And gambling is in fact advocating an approach to life where people do not view stewardship of personal resources as the means to get ahead. You don’t spend $1 to make $1 million. Life is not about giving the least amount to get the most. That is the wrong approach. Minimum input for maximum output creates the wrong kind of ethos.” 

Mr. Ebanks said the Cayman Islands has already fallen prey to this type of thinking to an extent in many regards and gambling would only compound this by introducing gambling. 

“It is about right values influencing our approach and not faulty reasoning. When our lives bottom line is money, we are in trouble. Gambling is getting something for free and we all know that little value is placed on something that is for free,” Mr. Ebanks said. 

Another pastor to weigh in on the issue was Rev. Forester of the Presbyterian United Church noted that, “Gambling is a game of chance and as such should not be practiced.  

There are many different forms of gambling but one of the ideals of Christians is that we should be helping the less fortunate and not enticing them to spend what they have with the lure of increasing it exponentially. We do not feel it is good for the society and have also taken the stance to not accept any funds from institutions with any gaming affiliations.”  

Most candidates in the 2013 General Election have taken the stance that the issue of gambling in the Cayman Islands should go to a public referendum. Several nonscientific Caymanian Compass online polls have shown large public support for the introduction of gambling. 

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3 COMMENTS

  1. My question to Pastor Al is why he would say Gambling is frowned upon by the church when he will not stand tall TO HAVE BARS CLOSED ON SUNDAYS? – Another political move by the church. Will someone say which is worse.

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  2. Here is a question for any church pastor who is contradicting themselves.

    Besides the fact, that your worried about your bottom line for money, being removed from your church due to gambling.

    Does the church ever host any raffles or bingos?

    Isn’t that EXACTLY the same thing as Mr Ebanks saying

    The problem with gambling is that it promotes an approach to life that is less than healthy. And gambling is in fact advocating an approach to life where people do not view stewardship of personal resources as the means to get ahead. You don’t spend 1 to make 1 million. Life is not about giving the least amount to get the most.

    Gee, hypocrite hypocrite hypocrite……Now if he’s contradicting himself. You gotta ask yourself why? Maybe he’s a bit more self serving and using the evils of gambling as a scare tactic, to watch his bottom line.

    It’s not more obvious than that.

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  3. Pastor AL are you aware that more money is spent on Booze from the Bars than is spent on buying lottery tickets. A person will spend a 5 or 10 dollars a night or on Sunday morning and buy a number; but men sit in the bars every evening and spend at least 25.00 or more, and on Friday and Saturday nights spend about 50 each night on drinking sprees. A mixed drink cost between 6 -7 dollars a beet cost 3 -4 dollars, and if they are buying for a partner, which most are doing will be spending double the amount. Then ever body get drunk go home and wake up broke. Fight with the wife and children and go out Sunday evening and credit alcohol until Friday evening. Tell me about it.
    I would like the pastors who object to buying lottery go on the radio and set themselves up for a discussion with questions from the public. I want to hear the pastors say something about alcohol Sunday trading.

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