Operation Tempura case judge joins Cayman's appeals court

A former U.K. High Court judge who once presided over various Cayman Islands court actions related to the ill-fated Operation Tempura investigation has joined Cayman’s Court of Appeal. 

Justice Sir Alan Moses was sworn in by Governor Helen Kilpatrick earlier this month. Justice Moses, a High Court Judge for 10 years and then a U.K. Court of Appeal judge, was most recently appointed as chair of Britain’s Independent Press Standards Organisation, formed after the Leveson Inquiry of 2011-2012 into various corrupt and unethical practices in the U.K. press. 

He also worked as a barrister in England and elsewhere in Europe, notably defending the first court cases before the European Court of Human Rights related to the release of prisoners serving life sentences. 

In Cayman, Justice Moses is also known as the judge who presided over certain matters related to the legal fallout from Operation Tempura. 

During one such case, involving the lawsuit filed against the government by former Royal Cayman Islands Police Commissioner Stuart Kernohan alleging wrongful dismissal, Justice Moses admitted to being “bewildered” by the twists and turns of the ongoing investigation. 

It was Justice Moses’s ruling in the case that dropped former Cayman Governor Stuart Jack as a defendant in the lawsuit, which Mr. Kernohan settled with government in 2014. 

Justice Moses also presided in the early stages over an open records fight involving certain records related to the Tempura investigation. 

That open records matter remains to be decided and could be headed back for a third round of court hearings next year – four years after the Freedom of Information request was made. 

The records sought are related to a complaint Operation Tempura’s former senior investigator Martin Bridger made against certain members of the local judiciary and the attorney general’s office and a subsequent evaluation of the complaint. Former Governor Duncan Taylor declared that complaint by Mr. Bridger to be unfounded. 

Sir Alan Moses
Sir Alan Moses