Tropical Storm Isaias heads for Bahamas and Florida

For the latest information on storm activity in the Cayman Islands, as well as information on how to prepare for hurricane season, visit Storm Centre.

A tropical disturbance in the eastern Caribbean has now formed a well-defined centre and has been named Tropical Storm Isaias, the ninth named storm of the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season.

As of 8am, Tropical Storm Isaias was less than 100 miles off the coast of Hispaniola. A projected storm path, released by the National Hurricane Center in Miami, Florida, shows Isaias travelling directly over the Dominican Republic and up towards the Bahamas and Florida.

Tropical Storm Isaias was producing winds of 60 miles per hour this morning. It is currently moving in a west-northwesterly direction at 20mph.

Projected wind map shows Isaias missing Cayman. However the National Weather Service warns some showers are likely in the Cayman area.

The Cayman Islands National Weather Service is currently monitoring the storm and said Isaias’ trajectory will see the system remaining outside of the Cayman area.

“This storm poses no immediate threat to the Cayman area,” said chief meteorologist Kerry Power. “However, an increase in cloudiness and shower activity is likely over the weekend.”

Meanwhile, a storm watch has been issued for the Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, northern Haiti and the Bahamas.

“Isaias will produce heavy rains and potentially life-threatening flash flooding and landslides for [the countries that issued storm warnings],” reads an advisory bulletin from the NHC.

Further east, another tropical disturbance has formed off the western coast of Africa.

The NHC said the system has a 20% chance of developing into a tropical depression over the next 48 hours.

If you value our service, if you have turned to us in the past few days or weeks for verified, factual updates, if you have watched our live streaming of press conferences or sent an article to a friend... please consider a donation. Quality local journalism was at risk before the coronavirus crisis. It is now deeply threatened. Even a small amount can go a long way to sustaining our mission of informing the public. We need our readers’ financial support now more than ever.

Donate