Today’s Editorial January 06: Good news to start 2009

Quite often, our readers accuse us of only printing bad news stories and editorials. It is true the media business in general conveys more bad news than good, partially because bad news gets more readership response from the public.

However, we are more than willing to print good news stories when they come to us. One case in point is the story that appears on the front page of today’s newspaper about fewer younger drivers avoiding fatal vehicular accidents.

Although the total number of fatalities caused by accidents in the Cayman Islands has remained about the same over the past three years, the number of fatal vehicular accidents involving teenagers reduced considerably last year. This happened despite the fact that the total number of traffic accidents went up during the year.

There is no clear-cut reason for the reductions, but perhaps – after the carnage of teenagers on our roads in years past – our youth is finally getting the message to slow down and drive responsibly.

Organisations like MattSafe and the Cayman Islands Road Safety Advisory Council have done their part to push road safety to teenage drivers over the years. So have the Royal Cayman Islands Police Service and Government Information Service with their Streetskill road safety campaign. Maybe those efforts are now bearing fruit.

Or perhaps parents are finally realising they need to be less permissive and more parental when it comes to the type of vehicles driven by their young children.

Maybe it has something to do with insurance companies refusing to insure cars with performance-enhancing modifications.

Of course it could be, as police have suggested, just pure luck more fatalities didn’t occur in the accidents in which teenagers were involved over the course of 2008.

Regardless, the reduction of fatal accidents involving teenagers in 2008 is a welcome respite during a year that generally brought bad news. We sincerely hope the statistics were not a fluke attributed only to pure luck and that teenagers continue the trend of being involved in fewer fatal accidents in 2009.

One thing that could probably ensure the continuation of the trend would be implementation of the amendment of the Traffic Law concerning graduated drivers’ licences. Even though the Legislative Assembly unanimously passed that amendment in February 2005, the current government has not moved to implement it because, as Cabinet Minister Arden McLean stated, it found anomalies and omissions in that law that it did not like. Hopefully, the anomaly of having a law that could save the lives of our young people sit in limbo for four years after passage will be corrected sometime soon.

BREAKOUT

Organisations like MattSafe and the Cayman Islands Road Safety Advisory Council have done their part to push road safety to teenage drivers over the years. So have the Royal Cayman Islands Police Service and Government Information Service with their Streetskill road safety campaign. Maybe those efforts are now bearing fruit.

0
0

NO COMMENTS