Editorial for October 22: Cayman plays by the rules

Take a has-been National Football
League player, a quiet school teacher, Las Vegas, a bag of diamonds and the Cayman
Islands and you’ve got the perfect script for a late-night television suspense
thriller.

After all, since the advent of
television and movies in the Cayman Islands we’ve seen our country painted with
a none-too-favourable reputational brush when it comes to high finance and
intrigue.

That’s unfortunate because we play
by some of the most stringent rules in the world when it comes to finance and
banking.

It would appear our good reputation
follows through to our retailers who deal in precious stones – like diamonds.

There really was a football player
and his school-teacher wife who picked up some diamonds in Vegas and turned
them into cash, selling them in the United States and in Cayman.

It wasn’t until the sale was made
in Cayman that authorities were alerted that the diamond did not belong to the
couple, who presented fake names when unloading the illegal ice.

Mr. Harry Chandi bought the diamond
from the couple with cash and other stones and immediately sent it to a New
York jeweller for appraisal and it was there that the stone was determined to
have been stolen from one Mr. Eli Abdalnour who lost the stones in a Vegas
strip club. We won’t go there.

Cayman does play by the rules in
finance and, it appears, in jewels.

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