RCIPS deputy paid $359,147.29 during leave

A Cayman Islands Deputy Police Commissioner off the job since late March 2008 has been paid $359,147.29 in salary and monthly pension contributions while he was not working, according to pay records provided to the Caymanian Compass under a Freedom of Information request.

Deputy Commissioner Rudolph Dixon was placed on required leave from the department on 27 March, 2008, during the ill-fated Operation Tempura investigation.

The RCIPS has released salary ranges for Mr. Dixon, which the Compass has reported on previously (see 16 March editions ‘More than $300,000 paid to suspended cop’). However, it has just been made public the exact amounts paid in salary and pension to Mr. Dixon.

According to the records, the suspended deputy commissioner was paid $306,706.75 in base salary between April 2008 and March 2011, including back pay and acting pay emoluments received in 2008.

Pension payments for Mr. Dixon over the period totalled $52,440.54, according to the RCIPS pay records.

Police disciplinary policy requires that the deputy commissioner receive payment until his matter is resolved.

Mr. Dixon was “temporarily removed” from office along with two other senior commanders caught up in the Tempura probe.

One of the other two commanders, former Police Commissioner Stuart Kernohan, was eventually fired from his job when he refused to return to the Islands at the governor’s request. He has since sued the Cayman Islands Government for wrongful termination.

The other man, Chief Superintendent John Jones, was exonerated and reinstated. Neither Mr. Jones nor Mr. Kernohan was ever arrested or charged in connection with alleged criminal activity during the Operation Tempura investigation.

Mr. Dixon was cleared of charges related to official misconduct and intending to pervert the course of public justice in October 2009. Mr. Dixon was accused in separate instances from 2003 and 2004 of ordering the release of criminal suspects without justification.

Following that acquittal, RCIPS Commissioner David Baines said Mr. Dixon would remain on paid leave pending the completion of police disciplinary enquiries. A year and a half later, it appears the suspended deputy commissioner’s fate is still uncertain. RCIPS officials have since directed all queries regarding Mr. Dixon’s continued employment in the police service to Governor Duncan Taylor’s office.

Mr. Taylor arrived here in January 2010, some months after the Operation Tempura probe had ended.

The head of the governor’s office, Steve Moore, said in mid-March that talks between Mr. Dixon and the police were continuing but that as far as he was aware, the deputy commissioner’s paid leave status had not changed.

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5 COMMENTS

  1. Apart from the rights and wrongs of the matter, this seems far too large a salary for the job. Is this true of the Police, Civil Service and politicians as a whole?

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  2. Old Hand: Aside from the rights and wrongs? Let’s stay focused, son! 359K since 2008 for doing Sweet-You-Know-What is the issue, not whether or not the position warrants roughly 119k per year.

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  3. Following that acquittal, RCIPS Commissioner David Baines said Mr. Dixon would remain on paid leave pending the completion of police disciplinary enquiries. A year and a half later, it appears the suspended deputy commissioner’s fate is still uncertain. RCIPS officials have since directed all queries regarding Mr. Dixon’s continued employment in the police service to Governor Duncan Taylor’s office.

    Mr. Taylor arrived here in January 2010, some months after the Operation Tempura probe had ended.

    360,000 smackeroos for doing absolutely nothing !

    Great job, if you can get it!

    They can’t fire him (without making the findings of Operation Tempura open to the public) and they can’t rehire him (because until those records are made public, his credibility would be totally compromised in the public’s eyes).

    If they fire him, he has the mother of all laws suits waiting on them and to defend the case, Operation Tempura’s reports would have to be presented in open court.

    And Governor Duncan Taylor and the Foreign Commonwealth Office have effectively silenced any questions on the matter and blanked any requests for the release of the report on the grounds of diplomatic immunity (basically).

    And our good journalist friend would have us believe that this massive cover-up is only about a few rougue British police officers having way too much fun in the sun when they should have been conducting a corruption investigation.

    How much is this cover-up going to eventually cost the Cayman Islands ?

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  4. Firery it’s all about people in the UK protecting their jobs and their reputations and they are prepared to spend the Cayman Islanders’ money like it’s going out of style.

    The secrecy is simply prolonging the myth that Tempura actually uncovered anything.

    Once that myth is ‘busted’ a number of senior civil servants in the FCO, and probably a few serving police officers are going to be ridiculed by certain factions of the UK media.

    I’m too old to care about any of it now but if I was 30 years younger, fast-tracking my way through HEO/SEO, looking at what used to referred to as Assistant Principal then Principal and a post even higher up the civil service food chain I’d spend 360K of someone elses’s money to cover my rearend without losing a minute’s sleep over it and that is exactly what is going on right now. This KYA time.

    How much more will spent? Who knows and those who are responsible would probably respond, and who cares?

    Incidentally, that FOI decision stands virtually no chance of surviving a full appeal to the UK’s Information Commissioner because part of the request refers to material already supplied to the media here – it’s a case of slamming the stable door after the proverbial horses have bolted and, as has been demonstrated many times in the past, that’s not valid grounds for refusal. The Bridger/Polaine complaint will be made public eventually – if not by me then by someone else because there are definitely copies of it around.

    There is also a lot more information being turned up about many of the key players in Tempura that brings the credibilty of the investigation even further into question and which will be placed in the public domain when it has been properly assessed.

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  5. John

    We’re actually much closer to each other’s views on this issue than you’ve been willing to admit…until now, that is.

    maybe you’ve missed one key fact here, which is…

    Its the Cayman Islands Government and people who paid CI 10 million and who’s paid CI360,000 and the tab is still running…

    So, by your reckoning, the CI Government has paid CI 10,360,000 to only cover up the rear ends of British civil servants who work for the Metropolitan Police Service and the FCO ?

    Surely, you’re stretching the limits of my intelligence, and many others, to believe that…

    There has been no confidential information released in the British press on this matter…

    Only the facts that we are already all aware of, which includes your prominent role in the entire affair…

    The Financial Times did a most thorough article on the known facts…

    As ex-Governor Stuart Jack has already said; in time, the entire facts will be revealed…

    If you believe that Caymanians believe that they have and are paying to cover up corruption other than within their own backyard…

    You don’t know Cayman half as well as you profess to…

    Remember, the bill is CI10,360,000 and still counting.

    I rest my case.

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