RCIPS officers gain expertise in community policing

Standing: PC Odale Mulgrave, PC Lazarus Moraes, PC Tamara Jackson, PC Clifford Garcia and APS Cornelius Pompey. Sitting: Paulette Chotan (UWI), PS Roje Williams, DCP Anthony Ennis, Dr. Francis Severin (UWI), Jody-Ann Moore, Edris Ocho (UWI) and PC Halston Farley.

Ten Royal Cayman Islands Police Service officers from the Neighborhood Policing Department have received certificates in community policing from the University of the West Indies.

On Sunday, Jan. 25, the officers graduated from the University of the West Indies Open Campus, after completing the first part of the intensive community policing course offered through the local branch of the university.

The officers completed the 11-week course while also maintaining their full-time policing duties.

Acting Police Sergeant Cornelius Pompey addresses graduates during the UWI ceremony.
Acting Police Sergeant Cornelius Pompey addresses graduates during the UWI ceremony.

Acting Police Sergeant Cornelius Pompey, who addressed the audience at Sunday’s graduation ceremony, said the course was well worth the effort.

“As an individual, you can make a difference but collectively as a team we can make a change,” Mr. Pompey said. “The UWI Open Campus has given us the tool to make that change. The experience and knowledge we’ve gained will be immediately put to use as we go about our daily duties as RCIPS Neighborhood Police Officers.”

Deputy Commissioner Anthony Ennis said he was “delighted” that several of the Neighborhood Police Officers participated in this training opportunity.

“We see from current affairs elsewhere that the law enforcement community and public officials are now revisiting this tested-and-tried policing philosophy to reduce tensions between community and police, while reducing crime through close collaboration with community partners and stakeholders,” Mr. Ennis said. “This creates safer neighborhoods and builds trust and confidence.”

According to an RCIPS press release, community policing was first introduced in the Cayman Islands in the 1990s.

“It augments the best of traditional policing with contemporary policing, with the objective of bridging the gaps and divisions in today’s diverse society, and sowing trust between communities and law enforcement,” the press release stated.