Jeffrey Webb

Cayman Islands businessman Jeffrey Webb has asked that a U.S. court delay his sentencing in connection with the ongoing FIFA racketeering probe again.

Federal prosecutors did not object to the request filed Aug. 20 and if the court in the Eastern District of New York agrees, it would be the eighth time Mr. Webb has received a sentencing date from the U.S. court.

Mr. Webb’s attorney, Ernie Gao, has asked to postpone six months beyond the currently scheduled Sept. 7 sentencing date. That would put Mr. Webb’s sentencing into March 2019 – nearly four years after he was first arrested in Zurich, Switzerland.

The former FIFA vice president was arrested in May 2015 and pleaded guilty in November 2015 to seven counts in a U.S. federal court indictment alleging he and dozens of other defendants conspired to rig sports marketing contracts for various world football events in exchange for millions of dollars in bribes.

The scheme described by U.S. prosecutors alleged Mr. Webb and others at FIFA solicited bribes from sports marketing companies in exchange for directing lucrative broadcast and commercial rights deals for various football tournaments to the bribe-payers. Dozens of U.S. banks were used to make those alleged bribe payments to Mr. Webb and others, prosecutors said.

It is unclear what Mr. Webb’s fate will be once his U.S. sentence is decided and any jail time assigned is served. He has been under house arrest since 2015, being allowed to venture out only for court-approved reasons, according to public records.

The Cayman Islands national is facing separate charges of conspiracy to defraud the local government in connection with the CarePay public hospital swipe-card scandal, and Anti-Corruption Commission investigators are looking into another matter involving the Cayman Islands Football Association, of which Mr. Webb was president for more than 20 years.

During earlier U.S. court proceedings, the presiding judge in the case noted that deportation was a likely result of Mr. Webb’s criminal conviction.

Comments are closed.