Today’s Editorial March 31: Doors open for rumours, innuendo

We find ourselves scratching our heads over the called press briefing held last Thursday.

Usually information from press briefings is just that.

What we were told and what many viewed on CITN and heard on Radio Cayman left us all with more questions than answers.

To quote Governor Stuart Jack, ‘…in the course of their original investigation certain other matters…have come to light which now, in the interest of protecting the high standards of the Royal Cayman Islands Police Service, we must look into.’

Following a question from a journalist at the press briefing the UK police inspector in charge of the case said, ‘In respect to the Commissioner (Kernohan), John Jones and Deputy Commissioner Dixon, there is no investigation taking place at this moment in time.’

As far as we know, an investigation refers to the process of collecting information in order to determine the facts of a case.

We would respectfully like to know the difference between ‘looking into’ and an investigation.

Despite strong words from Governor Stuart Jack to not castigate those involved in the investigation that isn’t being investigated, many in the Cayman Islands are assuming guilt on the parts of many.

And they’re doing it verbally and loudly.

It’s hard to determine who – if anyone – is guilty or innocent of what.

When the Governor uses language such as ‘…A public servant must not at any time engage in activity that brings the public service or the government into disrepute’ what are we to think?

While we in the Cayman Islands are left to speculate on what is or isn’t going on, the media in other countries are sure to pick up on this story and have a field day with this issue. Just take a look at the Friday edition of BBCCarribean.com

We’ve seen time and again attempts by media houses in other countries to put the Cayman Islands in a bad light.

The sudden placement of three top ranking police officials on required leave raises eyebrows here and beyond our shores.

Just Friday afternoon a programmer from a radio station in Jamaica called the Caymanian Compass requesting a live 10-minute interview over ‘that whole police issue.’

To quote the Governor again, ‘we should work together to ensure that rumour, innuendo and mischief making do not cloud the facts.’

By not telling us all the facts, the panellists at the press briefing have certainly opened the door for rumour-mongering. If you don’t believe us, take a listen as you stroll down the Marl Road.

While we in the Cayman Islands are left to speculate on what is or isn’t going on, the media in other countries are sure to pick up on this story and have a field day with this issue. Just take a look at BBCCarribean.com