Today’s Editorial May 12: Don’t over-develop the Brac

News of development on Cayman Brac is good and welcome.

But we want to make sure that the Brac doesn’t become like Grand Cayman.

Many of us can remember a Grand Cayman that wasn’t overdeveloped and traffic wasn’t a problem.

In fact, travelling to Cayman Brac is like going back in time to Grand Cayman.

Our Sister Islands supplement, which was published and produced last month, tells of the peace and tranquillity that exists on Cayman Brac and Little Cayman.

In it we hear the voices of old time Caymanians who want their islands to remain the quaint, quiet places of diversion that they are.

Ask any native Bracker or Little Caymanian and they’ll tell you – they don’t want their islands to turn into what Grand Cayman has become, especially on Seven Mile Beach.

And it is refreshing to know that we on Grand Cayman can go to the Brac or Little Cayman to get away from the hustle and bustle that has become Grand Cayman.

We do welcome the new hotel that is being built on the Brac. It is sorely needed.

We have to wonder, though, what is being done about the Divi Tiari development. It is eerily vacant and steadily falling into a state of neglect and decline.

It is an eyesore and sends a negative message to visitors.

On a positive note, we are pleased that the University College of the Cayman Islands has seen fit to put a satellite school on the Brac.

It means that students don’t have to leave home to further their education and that older people can take classes to expand their knowledge base.

We hope the scope of offerings can be expanded to include more diverse courses over time.

Both Cayman Brac and Little Cayman are unspoiled jewels in the Caribbean Sea.

While development is welcomed and needed, we hope that planners keep in mind the beauty of these two places and not allow overdevelopment.

It’s hard to tell on Grand Cayman, in the overdeveloped areas, whether you are on an island or in Miami.

That’s just something we don’t need on Cayman Brac.

Or, for that matter Little Cayman.

Ask any native Bracker or Little Caymanian and they’ll tell you – they don’t want their islands to turn into what Grand Cayman has become, especially on Seven Mile Beach.

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