Mosquito numbers rise with full moon

Cayman’s current approach to combating mosquitoes consists of aerial spraying by the MRCU plane, above, fogging from trucks, and the release of genetically modified mosquitoes, among other measures.
Cayman’s current approach to combating mosquitoes consists of aerial spraying by the MRCU plane, above, fogging from trucks, and the release of genetically modified mosquitoes, among other measures.

The Mosquito Research and Control unit has ramped up aerial spraying throughout parts of West Bay to tackle an increase of mosquito larvae numbers within the mangrove swamps.

“The recent full moon and new moon tides have resulted in larger than normal water levels,” said MRCU Director James McNelly. “As a result, we’ve seen a flooding of the mangrove swamps. While we’ve had some difficulties with the strong winds on Monday and Tuesday, we were able to resume spraying on Wednesday.”
McNelly said, so far, the results have been positive.

“We are seeing good efficacy,” said McNelly. “Our field officers have gone out and checked on the sprayed areas and we are seeing good mortality numbers.”
McNelly said MRCU staff are committed to monitoring and controlling the mosquito population.

He added that, since December, dengue numbers have declined.

“I’m not aware of any new cases of dengue or zika,” he said. “The last report cases were some time in December, but we will respond should we receive a report.”

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