For the latest information on storm activity in the Cayman Islands, as well as information on how to prepare for hurricane season, visit Storm Centre.

Forecasters have increased the chances of formation, through this week, for two weather systems in the Atlantic basin while a third system popped up on the radar on Monday afternoon.

These systems do not pose any threat to the Cayman Islands at this time.

The latest system on the radar, according to the National Hurricane Center in Miami, is an area of disturbed weather more than 500 miles south-southeast of the Cabo Verde Islands which has developed in association with a low pressure system located over the far eastern tropical Atlantic.

“Some slow development will be possible over the next several days while the disturbance moves westward to west-northwestward at around to 15 miles per hour over the eastern tropical Atlantic,” the NHC said.

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At this time, all three systems have a 40% chance of formation through the next five days.

Three systems are currently been monitored by the National Hurricane Center in Miami. – Photo: National Hurricane Center

Another broad low-pressure system more than 700 miles west of the Cabo Verde Islands is producing disorganised showers and thunderstorms over the eastern tropical Atlantic, the NHC has said.

While it indicated that little development is expected during the next couple of days due to only marginally conducive ocean temperatures, the NHC said some gradual development will be possible through the end of the week while the system moves northwestward at 10 to 15 mph over the central Atlantic.

Its formation chance through five days has increased to 40%, with a 10% chance of formation through the next 48 hours.

The third system, a tropical wave located over the eastern Caribbean Sea, is expected to form a broad area of low pressure over the southwestern Caribbean Sea by late this week, the NHC has said.

Environmental conditions are forecast to become favourable for gradual development while the system moves west-northwestward over the northwestern Caribbean Sea, it added, saying the system has a medium (40%) chance of formation through five days.

Formation of that system is unlikely through the next 48 hours.

Original story: Forecasters are keeping track of two new weather systems in the Atlantic basin.

These two follow the development of Hurricanes Grace and Henri.

Grace left its mark on Cayman on 18 Aug., passing 20 miles to the south as a strong tropical storm before being attaining hurricane status 65 miles west of Grand Cayman.

The islands experienced high winds and heavy showers which uprooted many trees on Grand Cayman and left some communities under floodwaters.

The island lost power at the peak of the storm’s passage early Wednesday morning. By Monday morning, 36 Caribbean Utilities Company customers were still without power.

The US National Hurricane Center, in its latest advisory on storm activity in the Atlantic Basin, has said a tropical wave located over the eastern Caribbean Sea is expected to form a broad area of low pressure over the southwestern Caribbean Sea by later this week.

The system is not expected to develop in the next 48 hours. However, the NHC has given it a 30% chance of formation within five days.

“Environmental conditions are forecast to become favorable for gradual development while the system moves west-northwestward over the northwestern Caribbean Sea,” the NHC said.

Meanwhile, the NHC said a broad low pressure system is producing disorganised showers and thunderstorms over the eastern tropical Atlantic, more than 700 miles west of the Cabo Verde Islands.

This National Hurricane Center image shows the two new systems currently being monitored.

At this time, it said, little development is expected during the next couple of days due to “only marginally conducive ocean temperatures”, but some gradual development is possible by the middle-to-latter part of the week while the system moves northwestward at 10 to 15 miles per hour over the central Atlantic.

The system is not expected to develop over the next 48 hours, but forecasters have given it a 30% chance of formation through five days.

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