Cayman Turtle Farm rejects researchers' claims of cruelty

Responding to a new study from Oxford University researchers calling the Cayman Turtle Farm “one of the cruelest wildlife attractions in the world,” Turtle Farm Director Tim Adam rejected the idea that the farm treats its turtles cruelly and attacked the research as flawed “pseudoscience.” 

The Oxford study researchers looked at wildlife tourist attractions around the world, including elephant rides, street-side snake charmers and wildlife encounters like swimming with dolphins. The study gave the Turtle Farm, the only such facility in the world, a positive grade for conservation efforts but the worst possible grade for animal welfare. 

Turtles at the farm, Mr. Adam said, “are absolutely not being treated cruelly.” He said the researchers have a conflict of interest and the study can’t be trusted because of the involvement of World Animal Protection, a regular critic of the farm. 

One of the main findings of the study is that tourists by and large are not concerned with animal welfare issues at attractions, or at least not those who visit places like the turtle farm or dolphin interactions and leave ratings on TripAdvisor. 

World Animal Protection, an animal welfare organization that has criticized the Cayman Turtle Farm for its practices numerous times in recent years, provided funding for the study, and the organization’s head of policy and research, Neil D’Cruze, is one of the five authors of the paper. The study scored wildlife attraction types for impact on conservation and welfare of the animals involved, and compared those to tourist feedback on the website TripAdvisor. 

The researchers write that these wildlife attractions “have substantial negative effects that are unrecognised by the majority of tourists, suggesting an urgent need for tourist education and regulation.” 

The Turtle Farm’s Mr. Adam said, “World Animal Protection has gotten itself in a panic because we won a TripAdvisor 2015 Certificate of Excellence.” 

The TripAdvisor site says the certificate of excellence goes to “accommodations, attractions and restaurants that consistently earn great reviews from travelers.” The more than 1,800 reviews for the Turtle Farm on the site give an average four out of five stars to the West Bay attraction. 

The study, published last month, ranks attractions from -3 to +3 for conservation and welfare. The worst attractions, both scoring -2 for conservation and -3 for welfare, are bear dancing and bear bile farming, where bears are kept in cages and their bile drained and sold for traditional medicines in Asia. 

Cayman Turtle Farm scored a +1 for conservation and -3 for welfare. Debates over turtle welfare aside, the researchers conclude, “Our figures indicate that the majority of attending tourists did not recognise and/or respond to negative welfare impacts.” 

In a statement, the animal welfare organization said, “World Animal Protection is very concerned that tourists, often no doubt lured in because of their love of turtles, are supporting the Farm without realizing that in actual fact, the facility’s conditions for turtles are extremely cruel.” 

Researchers acknowledge the potential for problems with basing a study on TripAdvisor reviews. Reviewers on the site are not a random sample, they write, and people concerned with animal welfare might avoid going to these kinds of attractions. 

Mr. Adam said the Cayman Turtle Farm has taken a number of steps in recent years to improve the conditions for turtles at the tourist attraction, and the meat production area is closed to visitors. He said the farm has reduced the number of turtles in each tank and is experimenting with giving a better variety of foods to the turtles more often. 

He said the farm is also installing shade structures above the tanks, beginning with the touch tanks in the public area. He said the farm has plans to put shade structures in the meat production area, but first plans to finish installation on the tanks accessible to the public. 

Holding a turtle is the highlight for tourists visiting the Cayman Turtle Farm, but the World Animal Protection organization sees such practices as cruel.

Holding a turtle is the highlight for tourists visiting the Cayman Turtle Farm, but the World Animal Protection organization sees such practices as cruel.
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  1. Mr. Tim Adams is so right. I have never had any tourists in 26 years say anything negative about the Turtle Farm. It has gotten better and better every year. Children and adults love the place. The water is clean they put soap and water to clean your hands,they have security guards and life guards ,etc. We need to expand the park and maybe offer more slides? But I’m sure Mr. Adams will make that decision when the dock is built.
    The only problem about Cayman has been environmentalists who are emotional too the fanatical level. In my opinion they’re like that cartoon " The sky is falling" ( Chicken Little)

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  2. I think that this is the kind of results that you would get when you let these kind of one sided opinionated groups in and voice their respective interest . I wonder if they have found cruelty in other farms around the world?

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  3. Looks like the WAP have really discredited themselves this time.Just think about it; they have commissioned a study,then appointed their leader as a member of the panel..Could only be with one purpose and that is to insure that the report states exactly what Mr De la Cruz and WAP wants it to say. If this was in Government we would be talking of corruption of the highest level; so I will say it "These actions of the WAP are indeed corrupt or corrupted”. To help explain I will use this illustration: If this was a court of law the Turtle Farm would be the accused,WAP would be the main witness ,as well as the prosecutor.In addition the prosecutor (WAP)selects the jury and appoints himself as a member of that jury (I guess he wants to avoid the possibility of an acquittal. Of course fair minded persons would call this ”Totally biased and corrupt”.

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