New RCIPS dogs ‘dangerous’ under the law

They may look cute and furry, but
six new recruits to the Royal Cayman Islands Police Service are dangerous – it
says so in the law.

The particular breed of
police-trained dogs being brought in by the RCIPS K-9 unit, the Malinois, are
listed in the regulations of the Cayman Islands Animals Law as ‘prohibited’
dogs.

Generally, such animals are not
allowed into the Islands unless special conditions for their kennelling and
care are met. However, the Animals Law (2003 Revision) makes provision for the
government to exempt certain animals from the prohibitions.

Section 88 of the Animals Law: “The
governor may, by writing under his hand for purposes of…protecting human life
or aircraft operations, exempt either absolutely or for such time and subject
to such conditions as he may think fit, any person or institution from all or
any of the provisions of this law.”

The RCIPS intends to seek such an
exemption for the six Belgian Malinois that are soon to become the newest
members of the force.

The K-9s won’t arrive in Cayman
until November because of Dutch authorities’ quarantine rules. When they do get
here, police said they will need to spend about two further months training the
dogs and allowing them to become familiar with their new handlers.

The six dogs will be trained as
general purpose patrol units for operations. Two will be trained for firearms,
explosives and drug detection.

The police service is in the
process of retiring its remaining K-9 animals, most nearing eight years of age
– generally considered to be ‘retirement age’ for police dog work.

LOCALRCIPSdogsSTORY

A full-grown Belgian Malinois.
Photo: File
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3 COMMENTS

  1. The Cayman Law for "Prohibited Breeds" is a joke. There are so many of the prohibited breeds in the Cayman Islands being bred and sold with full knowledge to those that are to enforce this stupid law. So our government has gone and bought dogs that are on the "list". Point being is they really do not know their laws. Second point, that now that they have bought the dogs they did not take the time to review the Dutch law. Does anyone in government ever take the time to check out all of the facts before jumping in to situations such as this. These dogs are great working dogs and will be a wonderful addition to our police force but now there is a long delay in getting them here at a time when they are needed the most. If you look back at the photo that was posted a few days ago you will see that the dog in that photo is also one on the Prohibited list. You can not expect a small weak dog to do this job. You need a large strong working animal that has the force and drive to do the job. I own a 100 lb German Shepherd, which is not on the prohibited list. I can say that no one is is going to come thru my doors or windows without a rude awakening. These 6 dogs are really needed by our police force. I can only hope they will be handled in the right matter and used for what they have been trained for. These dogs to not do well if kenneled to much and need a strong leader. I would like to see an article about the "Prohibited List" and an investigation in to the dog fighting issues that still not being talked about.

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